Thursday, December 8th, 2016

The Cat In The Hat Knows A Lot About That! Debuts On PBS Kids

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My kids are really lucky. They get to watch one of the new episodes of the PBS Kids series, The Cat In The Hat Knows A Lot About That! before the nation does. I received the screener this week and I have to say, this is going to be a great program. The rest of the country will be able to watch the premiere on Monday, September 6.

Voiced by award-winning actor Martin Short, Dr. Seuss’s The Cat in the Hat guides friends Sally and Nick – with a little help from the Fish, Thing 1 and Thing 2 – on fun-filled adventures where they make natural-science discoveries, from how bees make honey to why owls sleep during the day.

A team of science and early childhood experts developed the curriculum for the first season’s 40 episodes, each of which begins with a question posed by Sally or Nick.  Although the Cat knows a lot of things, his insatiable curiosity to learn more about the world leads to adventures with Sally and Nick in his one-of-a-kind Thinga-ma-jigger, a marvelously Seuss-ian contraption that sprouts wings, pontoons, booster rockets, skis, and just about anything else needed to find the answer. The inquisitive gang travels to the bottom of the sea to observe giant sea worms, zips to the rain forest to visit animals living in Kapok trees, and shrinks to bee-size to visit a hive and learn how honey is made.  Guided by the Cat, the kids figure things out by observing, collecting and managing clues, making connections, constructing and evaluating theories, and having discussions — all in a preschool-appropriate manner.

You got three things going for show. First of all Dr. Seuss is recognizable. That means your preschooler will probably pay attention. Second, the animation is great. To me, it’s close to the illustrations in the famous books. Three, it’s educational without being boring.

To go along with the series, there is an activity-filled website (PBSKIDS.org) to encourage kids to participate in character-driven exploration of science concepts. There’s also links for parents and teachers (PBSPARENTS.org and PBSTeachers.org) that will feature resources, tools and example questions to help children explore ideas sparked by the series.

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